iPhone battery

Apple issued a press release today about the iPhone’s battery life. Included was this comparison of smartphones:

iPhone battery

According to the above table the Nokia N95 does not have WiFi, which is incorrect. I’m sure Apple will quickly fix this, but it is not acceptable for a S&P 100 company to have made such a basic mistake in a product comparison for such a hot and closely watched product as the iPhone.

C# developer needed at DoubleTwist

We have an opening for an experienced C# developer at DoubleTwist:

  • Should have 5+ years experience in software development
  • Should have 3+ years of experience with .NET, C# and web services
  • Should have a degree in Computer Science or related field
  • Experience developing digital media applications is a plus
  • Experience with .NET under Linux (Mono) is a plus
  • You will be tasked with working on both our client software as well as server backend code. Besides coding, you will be responsible for assisting with documentation, building test plans, debugging software, providing design input, and helping in every way to ensure the successful rollout of each phase of the project.

    Location: San Francisco

    If you are interested, send us your résumé. If you know of someone who might be interested, please forward this to them.

    Monkeys needed at DoubleTwist

    Photo by Tetsuro MatsuzawaIf breaking down proprietary barriers and empowering consumers sounds like your cup of tea, send us your résumé. If you know of someone who might be interested, please forward this to them.

    Opening: Reverse Engineering Monkey
    We’re looking for a code monkey to work on our DRM interoperability technology. Must possess strong skills in the areas of cryptography, reverse engineering, AJAX, code disassembly, code protection/obfuscation and software optimization. Experience domesticating penguins and eating apples is a plus.

    Required skills include C, C++, x86 ASM, DRM and Windows APIs. Strong mathematical knowledge of algorithm analysis and implementation is desired. Minimum of 3 years of directly related experience.

    Your favorite number is 0x90.

    Location: Antarctica or your home country.

    Opening: Senior Software Monkey
    We’re looking for a senior code monkey to work on our audio/video products. Must have strong experience designing, implementing, debugging and optimizing userland applications. Multi-platform experience is desired.

    Required skills include C, C++, C# and Windows APIs. Requirements include strong experience with current digital audio/video technology (MPEG4, H264 and AAC). Minimum of 5 years of directly related experience.

    Location: San Francisco or Norway.

    Apple TV hacks

    What else to do when jet lagged than to unpack my brand new Apple TV?

    Apple TV box

    I wonder if the Apple TV is powered by a nuclear reactor because it runs fracking hot!
    Has anyone determined which photo they’re referring to?

    My unmodified Apple TV running vanilla MacOS X off a USB harddrive:

    Apple TV running vanilla MacOS X

    I enabled SSH and then installed Perian + ATVFiles. Now my Apple TV is able to play video formats that don’t fit into Steve’s master plan 😉

    Check AwkwardTV for a list of hacks.

    EMI goes DRM-free at higher pricepoint

    EMI has been rumored for months to start licensing DRM-free tracks at a higher pricepoint. From today’s press release:

    London, 2 April 2007 — EMI Music today announced that it is launching new premium downloads for retail on a global basis, making all of its digital repertoire available at a much higher sound quality than existing downloads and free of digital rights management (DRM) restrictions.

    Apple’s iTunes Store (www.itunes.com) is the first online music store to receive EMI’s new premium downloads. Apple has announced that iTunes will make individual AAC format tracks available from EMI artists at twice the sound quality of existing downloads, with their DRM removed, at a price of $1.29/€1.29/£0.99. iTunes wil continue to offer consumers the ability to pay $0.99/€0.99/£0.79 for standard sound quality tracks with DRM still applied. Complete albums from EMI Music artists purchased on the iTunes Store will automatically be sold at the higher sound quality and DRM-free, with no change in the price. Consumers who have already purchased standard tracks or albums with DRM will be able to upgrade their digital music for $0.30/€0.30/£0.20 per track. All EMI music videos will also be available on the iTunes Store DRM-free with no change in price.

    When people a while ago requested that Apple start selling DRM-free content from independent labels, some Apple fans argued that Apple couldn’t do this because it would break consistency in iTunes and create consumer confusion. Now Apple is going to be selling some DRM-free music at a higher price point. So much for the consistency and confusion argument! It will be interesting to see how this offering will be branded in the iTunes Store (DRM-free or “Higher Quality”?).

    EMI is the smallest of the four major record labels and is in the worst financial shape. More conservative labels such as Universal and Sony BMG are unfortunately not likely to follow anytime soon.

    Will Steve Jobs follow up with “Thoughts on Movies”? Highly unlikely, although the thought of a Disney director calling for an end to video DRM is entertaining! Steve’s main argument in “Thoughts on Music” was that CDs don’t have DRM. The studios have always insisted on copy protection (Macrovision, CSS, AACS) and that’s not likely to change in our digital lifetime. Perhaps Steve will start drafting another manifesto after the Apple TV has 90% market share 😉

    Update: Steve’s Thoughts on Movies during the webcast:

    Q: I take it then that you are going to be advocating the removal of the DRM of the videos you sell on iTunes. Any particular [inaudible] you could do that now with Disney given your involvement with the Disney company?

    A: You know, video, uh… I knew I’d get that question today. Video is pretty different than music right now because the video industry does not distribute 90 percent of their content DRM free; never has, and so I think they are in a pretty different situation and so I wouldn’t hold the two in parallel at all.

    Apple TV first impression

    I dropped by the Apple Store the other day to check out the Apple TV. I was disappointed with how the Apple TVs were demoed in the store. They were sharing the same Internet connection as all the Macs and due to the bandwidth being completely saturated by people browsing the web, it took several minutes before trailers would load on the Apple TVs. The Apple TVs should have been on a separate connection or the trailers should have been cached locally.

    Another issue was the disappointing video quality. While the menus and artwork were crisp and clear, the video quality of the movies and trailers was horrible. The Apple TVs should have been configured to stream the 720p trailers instead of the lower resolution ones.

    I felt that the remote for the Apple TV was too small and was not happy with the way video seeking was implemented. I think most people would prefer using a scroll wheel for video seeking.

    Out of the box the Apple TV is very limited, but there’s a lot of info over at AwkwardTV on how to make it useful.

    New notebook?

    I’m in the market for a new notebook. I’ve only ever owned ThinkPads (except for a brief fling with a PowerBook a couple of years ago).

    My current ThinkPad T42p has served proudly in the DRM wars and is entering retirement. It still does its job, but I want a notebook that’s not as heavy.

    I’ve been considering getting the ThinkPad X60t as it’s smaller and lighter than the T60. Unfortunately, it’s currently available from Lenovo with only a L2400 CPU and I haven’t been able to find much info on how well it runs Linux. Also, there are reports of screen ripple issues. I was worried that quality would go down when Lenovo bought IBM’s PC division… and on a related note, the new ThinkVantage and volume buttons are hideous!

    Should I switch to a MacBook Pro?

    Tumi Sucks

    On a recent trip to San Francisco I bought a Tumi Vista Super Light 20″ Wheeled Carry-On. On the way back to Oslo, having completed the SF-London leg, this happened:

    Tumi Sucks Exhibit A Picture 1 Tumi Sucks Exhibit A Picture 2

    It weighed 10 kgs (they weigh all carry-ons at Stansted) and I mostly used the wheels.

    I had heard good things about Tumi and their reputation for quality. I was hoping that this carry-on would be robust enough to last me a while, but I guess I have to start looking again. What would you recommend?

    Anyway, I should have known better than to buy a product called Vista 🙂

    Update: A Tumi representative got in touch and will be sending me a new carry-on. It’s a different model, so I’ll be posting a review soon 🙂 Thanks Tumi!

    Chocolate Mousse

    Note: Bumped this old post for all of you chocolate lovers out there!

    Happy ValentineIngredients
    4 dl cream
    4 eggs
    100 g sugar
    300 g dark (70%) chocolate
    100 g butter
    cognac

    Directions
    1. Melt the chocolate and butter together.
    2. Whip the cream until stiff. Put it in the fridge.
    3. Whip the egg whites until stiff, adding half the sugar slowly at the end of the process. Put it in the fridge.
    4. Whisk the egg yolks and the rest of the sugar. Add cognac.
    5. Mix in the melted chocolate.
    6. Mix in the whipped cream.
    7. Mix in the egg whites.

    Leave in the fridge for 3 hours.

    DAAP Licensing

    DAAP (Digital Audio Access Protocol) is a protocol defined by Apple and used for iTunes streaming. Apple has licensed the DAAP protocol to at least one company: Roku. Their SoundBridge product is a networked music player that streams music from your computer. Thanks to Bonjour and DAAP the SoundBridge can stream music from an iTunes library without any configuration necessary.

    The first version of DAAP was reverse engineered. In response, Apple added hashing of secret values to the next version of DAAP to block non-iTunes clients from connecting to the new version of iTunes. The new version of DAAP was also reverse engineered.

    When Apple released iTunes 7 last September, they changed the secret hashing. You would think they would have informed their DAAP licensees of this in advance and provided them with updated DAAP documentation (they wouldn’t need to reveal the release date of the new iTunes version).

    Not so.

    According to this forum post by Roku’s Mike Kobb they were not given advance notice, let alone any updated documentation. It appears that it took Apple several weeks to supply Roku with updated DAAP documentation.

    In light of this, it is not surprising that Steve Jobs is claiming that licensing FairPlay is not feasible and using bogus arguments to support his claim. Licensing FairPlay is quite feasible, it’s just that Steve doesn’t want to do so. Of course, from a business perspective I don’t mind 😉

    I knew last year that Apple had licensed DAAP to Roku, but I didn’t learn until today that Apple had stabbed Roku in the back. Thanks to snorp (developer of ipod-sharp and other cool code) for pointing this out to me.